Life in the Green Lane

Environmental journalist Candice Batista shares video clips and eco-savvy advice from her TV show, A Greener Toronto.

The current garbage strike in Toronto has people many angry and frustrated as to where to put all that garbage. Like you I am peed off, but I am also over it! The strike has been ongoing for the past few weeks and all I have heard from Torontonians is a great deal of whining about the strike and the garbage. Come on people...it’s time to start looking at the amount of stuff we throw away! It’s disgusting and alarming that with all the news coverage there has not been much said about the volume of waste we produce and the fact that even a smelly, garbage ridden city does not deter us from producing the amount of waste we do. The average person generates about 4.6 pounds of solid trash per day. This adds up to big problems for the environment. We are generating waste products faster than nature can break them down. We are also using up resources faster than they can be replaced. The question then remains, how can we meet our current and economical needs without compromising the ability of our kids and grandkids? First, we need to understand the difference between sustainable practices and non-sustainable practices. Sustainable practices: practices that provide ongoing economic and social benefits without degrading the environment. Unsustainable practices: "quick fixes" that fill an immediate need for resources. Over time, however, these practices deplete or damage natural resources so they cannot be used or enjoyed by future generations. For me, this strike is a way to look at my life and the waste I produce, my goal is to take this experiences and make it a positive one. I am a true greenie and am very aware of how much waste I produce, but having said that, I must admit, that seeing the waste I produce is a stark reminder that I could do more. This strike is a great opportunity to have a little fun with your kids by teaching them a thing or two about waste, where it goes, where it comes from and how we can reduce, reduce, reduce. Here are a number of great resources for ways to reduce your waste and help the city. www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/658123 www.ivillage.com/green/home/0,,bmcmtk9k,00.html www.greenontario.org/wastetips.html. www.treehugger.com/files/2009/03/fast-food-trash.php - this is a video! http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/human-footprint/trash-talk... www.thegreenguide.com/fastfact/4 Eco Candy.